Sandy Allnock Floral Watercolor painting for her Step by Step article using the DANIEL SMITH Floral Hand Poured Watercolor Half Pan Set

When the DANIEL SMITH Hand Poured Watercolor Half Pan Sets came out, I did what every artist does – SWATCH! – but in my own way; I find that painting an actual picture tells me so much more than just the little rectangles of color ever will! I painted out a mass of flowers with the 6 colors in the Floral: Cottage Gardens to Botanicals Watercolor Set.

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Sandy Allnock Floral Watercolor painting for her Step by Step article using the DANIEL SMITH Floral Hand Poured Watercolor Half Pan Set.
Watercolor Practice with the DANIEL SMITH Floral Half Pan Set by Sandy Allnock

This Watercolor Practice painting was created on artist quality, 140 lb cold press watercolor paper using a round #10 kolinsky sable brush. I made a video while painting this, you can see that video at the bottom of my article.


Painting out the colors in the DANIEL SMITH Floral Half Pan Watercolor Set. Sandy Allnock
Photo 1. Swatching the colors in the DANIEL SMITH Floral Half Pan Watercolor Set.

Photo 1. I drew out a rectangle, chose a spot for the title and boxes for the swatches. I went over the black lines with a permanent black marker, and swatched out the colors first.

Dropping in Quinacridone Rose, wet into wet.
Photo 2. Dropping in Quinacridone Rose, wet into wet.

Photo 2. First pass for the pink rose (saturated with water) with a little Quinacridone Rose dropped into it, keeping color in the bottom left area of the flower so the light clearly hits the top of the flower.

Adding Quinacridone Gold to warm up the red.
Photo 3. Adding Quinacridone Gold to warm up the red.

Photo 3. For the warm red rose, thicker Quinacridone Rose with Quinacridone Gold dropped into it warms up the color.

Adding in Green Apatite Genuine and Phthalo Blue (GS). Sandy Allnock.
Photo 4. Adding in Green Apatite Genuine and Phthalo Blue (GS)

Photo 4. Add a little Green Apatite Genuine on either side of the red rose – letting the color mix wet-in-wet. Using Phthalo Blue (GS) for the blue flowers, paint some with positive color, and a second stalk by painting water and letting color flow in. Drop in a little Quinacridone Rose and tip the board a little to get colors to mix.

Pink flowers are just swatches of red colors, Sandy Allnock.
Photo 5. Pink flowers are just swatches of red colors.

Photo 5. Pink flowers are just swatches of red colors, keeping a little drybrushing where possible on a few edges. Work quickly to keep leading edges wet and malleable!

Adding the yellow flowers, Sandy Allnock.
Photo 6. Adding the yellow flowers.

Photo 6. The section of yellow flowers touches the pink flowers – and leaves white space in between to add greens in the next step.

Adding both Green Apatite Genuine and Cascade Green, Sandy Allnock.
Photo 7. Adding both Green Apatite Genuine and Cascade Green.

Photo 7. See what Green Apatite Genuine looks like when it touches the Cadmium Yellow Medium Hue – and then try the Cascade Green. Many different types of colors can come from this one set of 6 colors!

Adding details, Sandy Allnock.
Photo 8. Adding details!

Photo 8. Let everything dry completely, then move on to pass 2: details!

For the roses, decide where the center is and paint semi-concentric circles but keep them uneven. Let edges touch, and allow some to disappear entirely. Only paint part of the rose – let the sun “blow out” the detail in the highlight portion of the flower

Adding deeper color to the blue flowers, Sandy Allnock.
Photo 9. Adding deeper color to the blue flowers.

Photo 9. The blue stalks are bell-shaped, so the darkest color goes into the deepest part near the top of the open bell; blend it at the bottom with water – and soften the whole thing with a spray of water.

Defining ruffly edges on the pink flowers, Sandy Allnock.
Photo 10. Defining ruffly edges on the pink flowers.

Photo 10. Blooms created on the pink flowers can help define ruffly edges; use pigment and water to create negative edges around individual blossoms.

Adding centers to the pink flowers, Sandy Allnock.
Photo 11. Adding centers to the pink flowers.

Photo 11. Add centers to the pink flowers, pulling out star-shaped centers with water.

Adding stamen to the yellow flowers, Sandy Allnock.
Photo 12. Adding stamen to the yellow flowers.

Photo 12. Adding little stamen to some of the yellow blobs (flowers) just to add a hint of detail.

Adding definition with negative painting to the green areas, Sandy Allnock
Photo 13. Adding definition with negative painting to the green areas.

Photo 13. If green areas need definition, do some negative painting to reveal leaf shapes in those areas.

Finished Floral Watercolor Practice painting by Sandy Allnock.
Finished Floral Watercolor Practice painting by Sandy Allnock.

Why I choose DANIEL SMITH Watercolors:

“My favorite paints by far are DANIEL SMITH watercolors…nobody makes higher quality and provides all the info that artists need to know about every color. When I paint, whether a fine art piece, a craft project, or a Bible journal page, I love knowing my paints are going to stand the test of time!”—Sandy Allnock

Sandy Allnock in her studio
Sandy Allnock in her studio

Sandy Allnock explores mediums for all kinds of art, and finds that high quality materials are just as important to all genres of creativity. Sandy began exploring watercolor only in 2014 in preparation for a trip across Europe the following year – and has fallen in love with the medium ever since.

Sandy studied art at Frostburg State University in Maryland, then spent decades in graphic design in both corporate and nonprofit situations. In 2013 she left that world behind and returned full-time to her true passion: creating hands-on art.  When she was a child, Sandy wanted to be an art teacher – and now as a blogger, author, and online instructor, she is delighted at the realization of that dream. She loves to help others release their inner God-given creativity, and watching students step out of their comfort zone and paint beautiful works brings her great joy.  

Sandy Allnock’s video of her painting out her Floral Watercolor Practice painting, lots of great tips!

PLEASE NOTE: in the video Sandy shows her DANIEL SMITH Floral Hand Poured Watercolor Half Pan Set with the six colors in the set, AND the extra colors she added to the 9 removable empty half pans to customize her set.