David Taylor F.V.A.S, Member A.W.I | Moving in the Shadows
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I have enjoyed the journey of working with the DANIEL SMITH colors I have chosen. There are still many more colors to explore further and I look forward with pleasure to the experience of further great outcomes as I push onward to creating special works of magic.

In this article I outline the process of a painting in progress and also show a few examples of other works using a selection of the colors listed below. I have seen great results from using these colors and have been excited by the outcome.

Stage 1. The Light Connection: This stage sets the base to build upon.
Manganese Blue Hue and Cobalt Blue worked for my buildings and Transparent Red Oxide mixed with Aureolin were used for sunny areas. Have a look at the complimentary mauve effect made with the Cobalt Blue and Quinacridone Magenta.

David Taylor’s Palette:

Manganese Blue Hue
Cobalt Blue
French Ultramarine
Cobalt Teal Blue
Phthalo Blue (RS)
Indanthrone Blue
Moonglow
French Ochre
Aureolin
Cadmium Yellow Medium Hue
Alizarin Crimson
Cadmium Red Scarlet Hue
Perylene Red
Quinacridone Magenta
Transparent Red Oxide

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Stage 2
To emphasize strong patterns of light some strong applications of French Ochre and Transparent Red Oxide were laid in on the large town hall building and the cool colors were encouraged to flow. You can see the granulation occurring – now the fun begins! Observe the wonderful effect of the sediment and granulation in the trees.

Stage 3: More Trees, Deeper Shadows
It is important to note that diluted color will dry a lot lighter – which you should allow for. The effect of the granulation on the trees in this process can be noticed and the painting is coming together. Some Cobalt Teal Blue was used for variation in the shadow areas. Sepia and Undersea Green were used to create some deeper passages.

Final Stage
The painting is pulled together with strong glazes of color, Figures and details are extended and the late shadows added. The colors can be seen to show subtle differences in the shadows. What I find useful and exciting is the way in which DANIEL SMITH Watercolors granulate and add a poetic dimension to the selection of works I choose to create.